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Posts Tagged ‘New Mexico’

It was less easy than we expected to get to New Mexico via the Rockies of Colorado. People tell us: “it is a Nino year” (pronounced of course ninio…but I don’t have the spanish wavy thingy on my keyboard). By that, people mean that 2010 is a bad weather, stormy year. We drove on the I-70 through Silverthorne, Breckenridge (beautiful ski station – forget Aspen -) and then Buena Vista and Alamosa. On the passes we drove through snow storm and strong winds, quite a change 10 days after Kauai and another excuse to go shopping for warm clothes.

Taos was a welcomed change. No wind, no snow and a shining sun. That meant we could get out of the RV! And I soon as we got out we met some real good people who invited us to put our big rig in their alley. Tim & Geneviève did not only accepted that we block their main entrance, they also invited us for dinner parties, sport and cultural activities in town and Tim ended up even riding his bike with me a showing me some good roads around town.

For those who liked Santa Fe in the nineties this is how Taos looks now. You can find Spas, Yoga places, alternative cafes, alternative arts & crafts, some ayurveda shops and more than your average quantity of adult Peter Pans. On top you find the most ancient continuously populated pueblo of North America: The Taos Pueblo.

Personally, I found that indigenous people could have done more of this place, to make it more…thrilling. But the rest of the family just loved it as it is and told me that I should not expect a Disneyland. So I won’t say more.

Overall we spent a very relaxing week there. And it was difficult to leave. But we knew, South Utah was waiting for us.

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In December 1997, I wrote from Gulu, Uganda (while I was still working for the International Committee of the Red Cross)  to a friend, that we should take a year off  in 1998, buy an RV and cross the USofA and Canada while training for triathlon. In the end, it did not happen. I left alone for a year in South East Asia and he joined me for a month in Bali. 13 years later: Another Dream Comes True. I am riding a time trial down the US255 direction the Great Sand Dunes Nat. Park in Colorado and Isabel is driving ahead with the RV!

This cruise with the RV is the last episode of our trip around the world. It takes us from Denver, CO  to Vancouver BC, via New Mexico, Arizona, South Utah, Wyoming, Montana & Washington.

We are all excited and fear this episode with the RV. On one hand it gives us unmatched flexibility and children have always the same home where ever we are. On the other hand, although we have rented a 10 meter long rig with slide-out, it still is nothing more than a sophisticated shoebox.

After 10 days riding this monster, we have learned the following: RVing is a great way to understand what we, as a family, consume daily in terms of Propane for heating, Gas for cooking & Driving and Water for Washing (all kind) and Dumping (all kind). RVing is a great way to build a hands-on knowledge of sewage and waste management. (A small note here on waste management; there is one thing you do not want: a leaking sewage hose…Well, I have now that one sorted). RVing is also a great way to keep things tidy at their right place. RVing is therefore great, right? Well, it is great as long as all those things do not start to go on your nerves.

Our first joint crisis comes after 8 days. Shoebox Fever! Very, very luckily we make contact at the same time with a wonderful French-European-American family in Taos. Their boundless hospitality and generosity gives us a unique opportunity to breathe outside the RV and discover the “Not-For-Tourists-Taos”.

So far so good. we have now crossed the cold, snowy but utterly beautiful Colorado and its famous Rockies and are relaxing in “springful” Taos, New Mexico. So far, so good…

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