Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for May, 2010

I have not updated this blog last month. Life in an RV is quite… intensive especially when it is cold and rainy outside. In the meantime we have arrived in Vancouver and got rid of the big rig…due to acute RV-fever. We now live in a comfy house by Kitsilano Beach and I have some time again to update that site.

South Utah is a world of its own with a very high density of National Parks, State Parks, National Monuments etc… We decided to avoid basically National Parks with Big Canyons as activities with children are rather limited there. We did not see ourselves in a place where we would have to shout : “get down from that fence or don’t slide down the canyon”. So we decided to have look at The Big Sand Dunes (big sandbox for children…ok…it is in Colorado), Monument Valley (Marlboro Country and Horses), Glen Canyon/Lake Powell Recreational Area & Capitol Reef (Mormons Promised Land and Orchards in the middle of desert). We also went to some small Parks like Goosenecks State Monument and Natural Bridges National Monument. And yes..all these are in South of Utah just about 300 miles apart.

They all have in common the color red and we realised that we never had enough of it. These monuments of baked sand are just…well…earth shattering. When you are in South Utah, you just wonder why-oh-why people go to see that one big red stone in the middle of nowhere in Australia. In South Utah you have one Ayers Rock basically every twenty miles.

So here is a sample of what we did in the out-of-this-world area.

1. Playing Desert Survival in the Great Sand Dunes of Colorado

2.  Horse Riding in Monument Valley

3. Getting dizzy on the rim of Goose Necks State Monument

4. Maneuvering the RV on Not-For-RV-Roads

5. Hiking & Riding  in the Natural Bridges National Monument

6. BBQ on the shores of Lake Powell (Glen Canyon) and cruising with the RV on water.

7. Feeling like Mosis arriving to the Promised Land in Capital Reef

Read Full Post »

It was less easy than we expected to get to New Mexico via the Rockies of Colorado. People tell us: “it is a Nino year” (pronounced of course ninio…but I don’t have the spanish wavy thingy on my keyboard). By that, people mean that 2010 is a bad weather, stormy year. We drove on the I-70 through Silverthorne, Breckenridge (beautiful ski station – forget Aspen -) and then Buena Vista and Alamosa. On the passes we drove through snow storm and strong winds, quite a change 10 days after Kauai and another excuse to go shopping for warm clothes.

Taos was a welcomed change. No wind, no snow and a shining sun. That meant we could get out of the RV! And I soon as we got out we met some real good people who invited us to put our big rig in their alley. Tim & Geneviève did not only accepted that we block their main entrance, they also invited us for dinner parties, sport and cultural activities in town and Tim ended up even riding his bike with me a showing me some good roads around town.

For those who liked Santa Fe in the nineties this is how Taos looks now. You can find Spas, Yoga places, alternative cafes, alternative arts & crafts, some ayurveda shops and more than your average quantity of adult Peter Pans. On top you find the most ancient continuously populated pueblo of North America: The Taos Pueblo.

Personally, I found that indigenous people could have done more of this place, to make it more…thrilling. But the rest of the family just loved it as it is and told me that I should not expect a Disneyland. So I won’t say more.

Overall we spent a very relaxing week there. And it was difficult to leave. But we knew, South Utah was waiting for us.

Read Full Post »